Old estates for sale

Celebrating the charming and character-filled historic properties for sale in Australia

Category: Victoria

Ivy Grange, Kew

Ivy Grange, Kew, Melbourne
POA

Ivy Grange has had several different uses over the past 149 years, but has only been the private residence to three families – the Vickers, Beaths and Lawlors.

Architect Charles Vickers built the basalt and cream brick gothic-style home as his personal residence in 1864. It was sold in 1873 to merchant David Beath, who named it Ivy Grange. Mr. Beath added the tower wing in 1877, and further additions were made by firm Reed, Henderson & Smart in 1885. Read the rest of this entry »

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Leggatts Coach House Hotel

Leggatts Coach House Hotel, Daylesford
$1,380,000

Leggatts Coach House Hotel (c1854) was built by Mr. Neil Leggatt and his wife Jessie to cater to the brisk trade from gold miners. The first gold was discovered in the area just three years earlier. The Leggatts emigrated to Australia from Scotland in the early 1850s. They settled in Daylesford and established a general storekeeping and gold-buying business before opening the Coach House Hotel.

The 2-storey building is situated on the banks of Lake Daylesford, although the lake did not exist until 1929 when a dam wall was created. The lake covers land upon which gold was first discovered. Read the rest of this entry »

Karori, Mount Macedon

Karori, Mount Macedon
POA

Karori was built in 1888 as the summer retreat of Charles William Chapman – a mining and pastoral investor from New Zealand. Chapman imported many materials for the house and trees for the garden. He also brought over Italian-born and NZ-based architect Louis Boldini to design the house, which bears some resemblance to the highly decorative wooden homes found in NZ. Boldini, who designed many buildings in Dunedin in the 1880s, also designed nearby guesthouse Braemar, in which Chapman also held a financial interest.  Read the rest of this entry »

Old Geelong Grammar School

Old Geelong Grammar School
$2,100,000

The former Geelong Grammar School is a Tudor Gothic style building dating from 1857-1858. It was designed by architects Backhouse and Reynolds and built of rendered bluestone and basalt.

The school went bankrupt only two years after completion, but was reopened in 1863. The school eventually moved to a new 400 acre site at Corio and the building was sold to the Geelong City Council in 1914. The Council had planned to convert it into a town hall, but the onset of WWI led to the land being subdivided and sold off. Read the rest of this entry »

Blair Athol in Brighton

Blair Athol Estate 2

Blair Athol, Brighton
Sold

Blair Athol was built in 1872 for Mr. and Mrs. Archibald Menzies – hoteliers who owned the Menzies Hotel on the corner of Bourke and William Streets in the Melbourne CBD.

The two-storey home was designed by Lloyd Taylor, who also designed ‘Chevy Chase’ and ‘Kamesburgh’ and was inspired by a house in the modern gothic or modernised domestic gothic style that appeared in Villas and Cottages by H W Paul and Oliver Ayliffe (1864-1865). Read the rest of this entry »

Bishops Palace, Ballarat

Bishops Palace, Ballarat
$6,500,000

Bishops Palace was built in 1877 as the residence of Bishop Michael O’Connor – the first bishop of the Diocese of Ballarat – and to provide space for the diocesan headquarters. The Ballarat Diocese was the first Victorian diocese outside of Melbourne and had opened the St Patrick’s Cathedral across the street from the palace just six years earlier.

The 2-storey Gothic bluestone mansion was designed by Reed and Barnes and built at a cost of £6,000. It was constructed by George Broom with internal plasterwork by William Taylor. It featured cast iron verandahs with ecclesiastical designs, a private chapel with an Italian marble altar and a dining room that could seat fifty guests. Read the rest of this entry »

Fortuna Villa still seeking buyer

Fortuna Villa, Bendigo’s most elaborate mansion, failed to receive a satisfactory offer during its sale-by-tender campaign which ended on December 7. A total of six tenders were received prior to the deadline, but did not meet expectations. A further three tenders were made after the deadline but were not opened.

The Defence Department will review marketing options and place the historic 60-room mansion back on the market this year. It was reported earlier that they were hoping for offers of around $3 million, however Labor’s Federal Member for Bendigo, Steve Gibbons, believes this figure is too high.

*Update: The villa was reported to have sold at auction on April 12, 2013, for $3,000,000, but the sale fell through. It later sold to a private individual for $2.21 million

Read more about Fortuna here.

Sources:
Historic Bendigo mansion up for sale again, ABC News, January 4, 2013.
Bendigo’s Fortuna Villa fails to sell, Bendigo Advertiser, January 3, 2013.

Rutherglen Distillery Ruins

Rutherglen Distillery
Sold

The ruins of a former brandy distillery dating from 1896 are for sale.

In the early 1890s, members of the Rutherglen Vinegrowers’ Association formed a wine company called the Rutherglen Wine  and Brandy Company to protect the reputation of the Rutherglen area. Many small growers were producing inferior product at the time, so the company decided they would purchase it to prevent it from hitting the market and turn it into brandy. In 1899, 2,000 gallons of brandy were sold in Melbourne. Read the rest of this entry »

Carinya, Spanish Mission in Toorak

Carinya, Toorak
$16 ~ $18 million

Carinya is a Spanish Mission mansion in Melbourne’s top residential district of Toorak. The home was built in 1925 for wool and skin broker Herbert William Lee and his family. It was designed by architects Isadore George Beaver and Arthur William Purnell.

The house features American oak flooring and panelling, Venetian stucco and art nouveau fixtures. Sadly there are no interior photos as the owner has has requested interiors only to be viewed by qualified buyers. Read the rest of this entry »

Ivanhoe East’s Rangeworthy

Rangeworthy, Melbourne
Expression of Interest

Rangeworthy was built in 1910 for Thomas James. The transitional Victorian / Edwardian red brick residence was built on Lot 17 of the Rangeworthy Estate – an area subdivided in 1901 by Councillor and timber merchant William J. Brewer.

The total estate covered 70 acres and had 107 allotments priced from 25 ~ 40 shillings per foot. Strict building codes were enforced, such as requiring houses to be built to a cost of at least 350 pounds, in order prevent any ‘small cheap tenements’ from appearing.  Read the rest of this entry »